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Mindful Shopping + 3 Proven Tips to Get You Started

Mindful Shopping + 3 Proven Tips to Get You Started

Less is more. Do you agree? Whether you do or not, a 2-in-1 bottle of your favourite hair moisturizer is sure to get more attention than 2 separate products with 2 separate purchases.

Considering the amount of uses for a product (hello coconut oil!), you may not only save counter space but some money too!

But this isn't a blog post on minimalism or on the pros and cons of a 2-in-1 deal. Rather it's a post about getting in touch with the world around you, in such a way that gives meaning to the details. Especially as a highly sensitive person!

What is Mindful Shopping?

To get into this concept, I think it's best to first go into what "mindless shopping" is: see something once, put it in a (virtual) basket, and whip out a credit card.

Marketing has gotten REAL smart and, though I love the behind-the-scenes of marketing myself, when used without the foundation of service, it can be very misleading.

Which is where "mindful shopping" comes into play!

The thought that we can actually shop with more awareness is not a new concept but one that few practice - being genetically wired to consume and all.

Let me ask you, how excited do you get when you leave a store with only exactly what you had gone in there for, nothing else?

Me personally, there have been times I've felt like a complete rockstar - never having been a rockstar but you know what I mean 😉

Focused, in the moment, appreciating the abundance surrounding you but not getting caught up on the "fear of missing out" of whatever has its "lights" flashing toward you.

To be a mindful shopper is to practice being more present and in tune with what drives your spending and getting to know/understand the environments that allow you to feel more confident in your selections.

3 Proven Tips to Help Your Mindful Shopping

1) Do Your Research: I think you may have come to this one on your own but it's just so important, I had to start here.

Whatever you need (or want!) to buy, make sure you do some research on what's important to you. For example, I may be needing a new toothbrush and being more aware of the impact of plastic on our planet, I did some research for alternatives. I decided on Brush Naked by the way.

It was a need I had to satisfy but instead of going to the local store to grab something I would've normally picked up when I was less aware, I did my research and made a purchase.

2) Have a Plan: whether you're headed for groceries in this moment or you're meeting up with a friend who wants to go "shopping", have a plan in your back pocket. It's especially helpful if you tend to get overwhelmed and overspend at a store.

Pick a day in the next week or so to go through the items that are already in your home - pantry, clothing, books, "things". Choose one category and go from there.

If it's groceries that you're getting, go through your kitchen. What recipes are you planning on making this week? What staples are you running out of? Write them out. I know it's a pain to do but it will only be a pain until it becomes a habit ;)

3) Pause: so you've done your research on the what and where, and you have a plan in place, but you take one step inside and look at all those vibrant colours pointing toward "New In Stock". You're caught up in the moment, it's just what you needed (not really but our mind tells us it will make wiping the kitchen counter so much easier - true story!).

Have a good look at it and answer the following questions to yourself:

  • does it satisfy a need or a want? Whatever the answer, you're making an informed decision.
  • am I going over my budget if I pick this up?
  • will I use it having it at home? Don't bypass this one. It's not enough to think you'll figure out where you'll use it on once at home. Know that you will before you buy it.
  • walk away. Go do what you were there to do, then, come back. If it's still something you want/need to buy and you feel strongly about it, go for it.

You know you can respond to these questions in a way that supports your impulse but do your best to be honest with yourself. The only person you'd be fooling is you if you go that route.

The thing is that when we allow fear and anxiety to dictate our "need" for that throw rug on display at the mall, feelings of regret tend to follow. You don't have to become a minimalist to practice mindful shopping, you simply need to be practicing being in the moment while you're out there, love.

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